Tag Archives: java

How to write effective GUI test automation code using Selenium and Java

12 Jun

Just searching on Internet and got this document. In this presentation, you can get some useful information about how to write effective GUI test automation code using Selenium and Java

1. Introduction: What’s Selenium
2. What we achieved
3. 7 good practices using Capture Replay Tools

– GUI element repository.

– Division of data and script.
– Model the test objects.
– Establish standard functions and methods using “speaking” names.
– Central management of environment information.
– Divide common from project specific stuff. Use layering.
– Generate a useful test report
4. What’s missing in Selenium and how we closed the gap
5. Forecast

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[Slide] Automated Web Testing with Selenium for beginners

6 Jun

You can find useful information for this presentation.

1. What is Selenium?

– Test tool for web applications
– Runs in any mainstream browser
– Supports tests in many languages
– Selenese (pure HTML, no backend required)
– Java, C#, Perl, Python, Ruby
– Record/playback (Selenium IDE)
– Open Source with corporate backing
– Lives at selenium.openqa.org

2. Demo

– Record a test in Selenium IDE
– Show same test written in Java

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Source from Erik Doernenburg, ThoughtWorks

List of ebooks about selenium you should read

5 Jun

1. Selenium 1.0 Testing Tools: Beginners Guide

The Selenium Testing Tools Beginner’s guide shows developers and testers how to create automated tests using a browser. You’ll be able to create tests using Selenium IDE, Selenium Remote Control and Selenium 2 as well. A chapter is completely dedicated to Selenium 2. We will then see how our tests use element locators such as css, xpath, DOM to find elements on the page.

Once all the tests have been created we will have a look at how we can speed up the execution of our tests using Selenium Grid.

A beginner’s guide to writing Selenium tests using different aspects of the Framework to give you confidence in your web application

Test your web applications with multiple browsers using the Selenium Framework to ensure the quality of web applications

2.  The 2nd edition of “Selenium Simplified

“Selenium Simplified” takes you through the process of installing and learning to use all the basic tools needed to write automated tests using Java as the programming language. Written in a tutorial style, this book helps you learn to code even if you haven’t programmed before. No time is wasted on the theory of automation or padding about the tools. This book focuses on the practical knowledge needed to automate tests for production systems.After reading this book you will be able to: -Write tests in Java – even if you haven’t coded before reading this book-Install and maintain all the free development and testing tools covered within: Eclipse, JUnit, Selenium, Hudson, Subversion, Xpather, Selenium-IDE-Write automated tests scripts using Java and Selenium-RC-Create abstraction layers to make your automated tests maintainable and readable-Run your automated tests under continuous integration-Use multiple browsers to execute your tests-Understand the most utilised commands in the Selenium API-Test Ajax based web applications-Use Xpath and CSS Selectors in your tests-Understand how to optimise and refactor your tests-Use JUnit for data driven testing.

3. Java Power Tools

All true craftsmen need the best tools to do their finest work, and programmers are no different. Java Power Tools delivers 30 open source tools designed to improve the development practices of Java developers in any size team or organization. Each chapter includes a series of short articles about one particular tool — whether it’s for build systems, version control, or other aspects of the development process — giving you the equivalent of 30 short reference books in one package. No matter which development method your team chooses, whether it’s Agile, RUP, XP, SCRUM, or one of many others available, Java Power Tools provides practical techniques and tools to help you optimize the process. The book discusses key Java development problem areas and best practices, and focuses on open source tools that can help increase productivity in each area of the development cycle, including: Build tools including Ant and Maven 2 Version control tools such as CVS and Subversion, the two most prominent open source tools Quality metrics tools that measure different aspects of code quality, including CheckStyle, PMD, FindBugs and Jupiter Technical documentation tools that can help you generate good technical documentation without spending too much effort writing and maintaining it Unit Testing tools including JUnit 4, TestNG, and the open source coverage tool Cobertura Integration, Load and Performance Testing to integrate performance tests into unit tests, load-test your application, and automatically test web services, Swing interfaces and web interfaces Issue management tools including Bugzilla and Trac Continuous Integration tools such as Continuum, Cruise Control, LuntBuild and Hudson If you area Java developer, these tools can help improve your development practices, and make your life easier in the process. Lead developers, software architects and people interested in the wider picture will be able to gather from these pages some useful ideas about improving your project infrastructure and best practices.